Lancashire MP slams mental health trusts for ‘pulling bobbies away from the beat’

West Lancashire MP Rosie Cooper has blasted NHS mental health trusts for their reliance on the police. Mrs Cooper has raised the matter with the Secretary of State for Health, claiming that local NHS Trusts like Lancashire and South Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust and Greater Manchester Mental Health have told her to refer mental health crises to the local police rather than intervene themselves.

Mrs Cooper said: ““It cannot be right that the already stretched police force are being made to do the job of the NHS! We shouldn’t be pulling bobbies away from the beat and asking them do welfare checks on patients suffering a mental health crisis.

“My office recently received a call from a resident that said they were suicidal. When we contacted the person’s mental health team within Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust, we were told to call the police instead!

“Crises like this need to be dealt with by the trained healthcare teams responsible for the patient rather than expecting the police to intervene.”

She added: “I am told in the past three years, Lancashire Constabulary have spent on average 30.7 hours per day deploying to ‘Concern for Welfare’ calls from other agencies like Mental health providers. The Police force should not be expected to do NHS work when they should be catching crooks.

“In 2021, Lancashire police received over 234 requests for assistance with patients on mental health wards, forcing them to spend hours in hospitals rather than out in the community. I understand that health services are stretched themselves, but this is not an excuse to place the responsibility of mental health care crises onto the police. 

“We need a proper solution where NHS Mental Health Services actually react to the crisis, not depend on the police to do their job for them.

“We know that there are some specialist units where the NHS and Police have a dedicated team to respond together. There is one in the Manchester health area – yet it wasn’t deployed in this case – my staff were told to ring 999 – that’s not good enough!”

Full story here

Source: Lancashire Post, 31st December 2021

Psychiatric hospital ordered to improve after failing to provide ‘caring environment’ for patients

A psychiatric hospital has been ordered to improve after a watchdog found it was failing to provide ‘a caring environment’ that respected patients’ dignity and helped them recover.

Cheadle Royal Hospital, in Heald Green, has in-patient wards for adults and children as well as specialist eating disorder services.

It was previously rated ‘good’ overall by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) at its last full inspection in 2017.

The service has now been downgraded to ‘requires improvement’ after officials identified a ‘number of concerns’ at a visit earlier this year.

This is despite the watchdog noting that ‘staff treated patients with compassion and kindness’ and ‘developed holistic, recovery-oriented care plans’.

The Priory Group, which runs the hospital, says it is ‘working hard to make the improvements identified’ by the CQC.

During the visit, safety was found to be ‘inadequate’ in the acute adult wards and psychiatric intensive care units, as well as on the child and adolescent mental health wards.

A newly published report notes that ‘not all wards were safe, clean, well equipped, well furnished, well maintained and fit for purpose’.

On the adult wards, inspectors found problems relating ‘to the maintenance of ward areas, furniture and some essential equipment’.

The inspection report reads: “Ward areas were mostly clean, but were not well maintained, and we found furniture that did not meet infection control standards.

“We found evidence that maintenance of ward areas was not being kept up to a good standard.

“We found paint and plaster peeling off doors and walls in a range of corridors and rooms that patients used. We found evidence of mould and damp in patients’ bathrooms and in some communal spaces.”

CQC officials raised the issue with the hospital and were told that a programme of maintenance had been agreed but was waiting to start.

Other concerns included chairs blocking a corridor that led to a fire exit – albeit these were removed ‘immediately’ after being brought to the hospital’s attention.

The service had also not ensured that all staff had access to alarms to alert colleagues in the event of an emergency, though,this was also dealt with promptly once raised.

And a lounge for women was being used as a visitors’ room, meaning it was not alway possible for female patients to make use of it. This did not reflect the Department of Health same sex accommodation guidance.

Wards for children and adolescents were found to be ‘generally clean, well furnished and fit for purpose’ but were not well maintained.

The report adds: “On Meadows ward, paint on the majority of doors was chipped and cracked. This did not contribute to a homely environment for the patients and was also an infection control issue, as it would not be possible to appropriately clean these areas.”

It continues: “On Orchard ward, we observed issues with mould in ensuite bathrooms and in the laundry room. There were also issues around maintenance not being completed in a timely manner.”

On all three children’s and adolescent wards, the yearly checks on essential equipment, including the defibrillator, had not been completed.

Staff were completing regular checks, however, as it had not been calibrated by the company responsible there was no guarantee it would work properly in an emergency.

CQC officials raised this as a matter of urgency during the inspection and the report notes that ‘the provider took actions to address this issue’.

The watchdog acknowledges that the hospital addressed the most serious concerns immediately.

However, it has also issued warning notices for two breaches of regulations ‘to ensure that swift action is taken, and plans put in place to maintain improvements’.

A spokesperson for the hospital said: “We are working hard to make the improvements identified by the Care Quality Commission.

“Our maintenance programme was disrupted by the pandemic, when additional infection prevention measures were in place making it more difficult for contractors to access the site. Now that the restrictions have been lifted, we have made significant progress on our refurbishment plan.”

They continued: “Work has been completed on one PICU ward and is ongoing throughout the rest of the hospital. Prior to the inspection annual services for our safety equipment had been booked, and these have now been completed.

“We have ensured there are sufficient staff alarms, and that they are accessible on all wards. Governance processes have been reviewed, and are being strengthened where necessary.”

The watchdog acknowledges that the hospital addressed the most serious concerns immediately.

However, it has also issued warning notices for two breaches of regulations ‘to ensure that swift action is taken, and plans put in place to maintain improvements’.

Full article here

Source: Manchester Evening News, 16th November 2021

Man charged with attempted murder after patient stabbed at mental health unit

A man has been charged with attempted murder after a patient was stabbed in the mental health unit of a hospital.

Police rushed to reports of a stabbing on October 27 at Park House, which contains adult inpatient mental health wards on the North Manchester General Hospital site.

A man in his 30s suffered serious injuries and had to be treated at the scene before paramedics could rush him to hospital for further aid.

An ambulance, air ambulance and a paramedic in a response vehicle all attended the scene.

A man, also in his 30s, has now been charged with attempted murder, officers have confirmed.

The incident is under both a criminal investigation, according to the force and the trust which runs the unit.

A spokesperson for Greater Manchester Police has said: “Police were called shortly after midday (Wednesday 27 October) to a report of a stabbing at Park House, Manchester.

“A man in his 30s suffered serious injuries but is now in a stable condition.

“A second man in his 30s has been charged with attempted murder.

“This was believed to be a contained incident and GMP are working with staff at North Manchester General Hospital to investigate the circumstances.”

Park House is operated by Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust, and includes eight wards.

The wards hold a range of patients, with both male and female acute wards; a male psychiatric intensive care unit; an all-male rehabilitation unit; and a female later life ward.

A spokesperson for the trust told the Manchester Evening News : “We can confirm an incident occurred at the Park House unit of North Manchester General Hospital on 27 October 2021.

“We are cooperating fully with Greater Manchester Police’s investigation.

“It would be inappropriate for the Trust to comment further at this time.”

Full article here

Source: Manchester Evening News, 19th November 2021

Patient’s disgust over ‘revolting’ state of mental health ward as disgusting photos show overflowing bins and ‘blocked toilet and sink’

A patient was left horrified after being placed on a mental health ward where she says her ‘sink was blocked’, the ‘bathroom was filthy’ and she was left ‘on her hands and knees cleaning the floor of her room’.

Pictures captured by the patient appear to show the ‘overflowing bins’ and ‘blocked toilet’, expected to be used by people occupying the 21 beds on the Medlock Ward of the Moorside Unit at Trafford General Hospital.

he 48-year-old patient, who arrived at around 7pm on Tuesday evening (November 23), says she was unexpectedly transferred after a week-long stay in Wythenshawe.

READ MORE: Patients on trolleys in corridors, kids with weak immune systems filling A&E, and GPs who can’t give you answers – what it’s really like right now in the NHS

Upon her arrival at Trafford General, she was led to a ward and room she claims were ‘disgusting’.

The conditions were so dire, says the patient, they were detrimental to her mental health, which she was there to be treated for in the first place.

A Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust spokesperson apologised and said it ‘falls way below the standards we set ourselves in terms of cleanliness and patient environment’, and said ‘immediate action’ had been taken.

After that, she says she was shown to a room which had not yet been cleared after the last patient.

The ward is an adult, female-only ward supporting patients with mental health concerns, operated by Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust.

“They weren’t expecting us, they didn’t know about [my transfer]. Fair enough, communications issues happen,” the patient told the Manchester Evening News .

“Then I was shown to, what was called, ‘my room’. But the linen hadn’t even been changed from the previous patient, it was all still there.

“They had to hurriedly sort it all. I asked the nurse ‘are you going to wipe it down?’ And she said ‘yeah, I’ll do that’. She did but she said ‘oh, we didn’t realise the sink was blocked in here, I’ll flag it as urgent’.

“I had to sweep my bedroom myself because the floor was so filthy with bits on it. I asked for a dustpan and brush, got a load of disinfectant wipes. I got on my hands and knees and wiped the floor down. I don’t want to touch anything because it’s revolting. “

More than 12 hours after the staff member labelled the blocked sink as ‘urgent’, no one had been to solve the problem, claims the patient.

The frustrated woman decided to use the communal bathroom to wash instead, only to find yet more ‘squalor’.

“When I went to have a wash in the bathroom, because I couldn’t in my room with the sink being blocked, I couldn’t even put my soap and towel down because I didn’t want them to touch anything,” she continued.

“The bathroom was so filthy. There’s only three toilets – one of them is blocked and the other two have no toilet paper in them.

“You’re limited to what you can do, really.

“The basic human rights of going to the toilet, for example – I’m having to go round looking for hand towels to use as tissue because I need to use the toilet. It shouldn’t be like that.”

Meanwhile, in the kitchen, bins were ‘overflowing’, explained the patient, who the M.E.N. is not identifying to protect her privacy.

“I thought, ‘I’ll go and get a cup of tea’, I went to put my teabag in the bin and the bins were overflowing onto the floor,” she said.

“A staff member told me to ‘just throw it in’, I told them ‘this is disgusting, just shocking that people are being left like this’.”

‘It’s not good for my mental health’

The patient, from Urmston, does not yet know the length of her stay on the Medlock ward, leading to fears that her mental health will regress because of the conditions.

“It’s ironic but it’s actually not good for my mental health to be here – you can’t go to the toilet, you can’t have a shower, you can’t have a wash to feel clean. It’s absolutely harming my recovery.

“When I was at AMU, it was lovely. I had a shower there, nothing was blocked, it was really nice.

“I don’t know how long I’m going to be staying here but I’m hoping my family will be my advocates and get me home as soon as possible.

“I want to go home so I can be in a clean environment.”

“They just seem under-resourced in every area.

“I’ve stayed in my room as much as possible. I go out to the toilet if I need it, but how clean is it in light of things like Covid? Are surfaces wiped down, handles? I don’t trust it.

“The only person I’ve really seen to talk to about the mess was the nurse who told me to put my tea bag on top of the bin pile.

“I think they get away with it because they think no one is going to listen to the mentally ill. They can give us conditions that are not worthy of criminals and we just have to accept them, there’s little we can do about it.

“This isn’t acceptable at all. This is why I want to speak out.”

After the M.E.N. approached the trust with the pictures, the patient says cleaning staff attended the ward to mop her room and unblock the sink.

Investigation launched, trust says

A spokesperson for Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust indicated that staff are unsure how the conditions deteriorated – an investigation has now been launched to find out.

A trust boss then issued an apology to the patient.

Gill Green, Director of Nursing and Governance for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, said: “We are very sorry for the experience this individual had on our Medlock Ward at the Moorside Unit in Trafford. This falls way below the standards we set ourselves in terms of cleanliness and patient environment.

Full article here

Source: Manchester Evening News, 25th November 2021

Union fears ‘dangerous’ low staffing levels at Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust are harming patients

As reported in the Manchester Evening News last week a watchdog is “very concerned” about the safety of people using the services of Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Trust.

A damning report said inspectors found there were not always enough nurses and that permanent staff did not feel safe if bank or agency workers were used as they didn’t have the relevant training.

It follows an unannounced inspection in September by the Care Quality Commission “due to on-going concerns about the safety of services”.

Now UNISON says it is concerned about “dangerous” staffing levels across the Trust’s sites in Prestwich, Trafford, Manchester, Wigan, and Bolton.

A Unison spokesperson said: “Our members have reported across the Trust that staffing levels are at dangerous levels and that this is impacting both upon patient care and staff well-being.

“Some of our members within the Early Intervention Service have recently voted for strike action over Trust re-organisation plans which would leave their service even more stretched.”

Unison North West regional organiser, Lyndsey Marchant, added: “Staffing levels are causing problems throughout the Trust. Recent reports about Prestwich Hospital were incredibly worrying, but UNISON is also concerned about issues within our community mental health services.

“Community mental health services do vital preventative work, which can often avoid young people from people admitted to facilities like Prestwich Hospital.

“Community mental health services are under-appreciated and under-resourced and we are particularly concerned about the impact of the Trust’s flawed proposals, which could stretch the overloaded Early Intervention Services to breaking point.

“Given the reported problems in other areas of the Trust, we call on Trust management to show they have fully heard frontline workers’ concerns about staffing. The best way to do this would be to propose a new offer that provides its hard-working staff with the resources they need to deliver excellent care.

“UNISON was deeply saddened to hear of the deaths of three young people at GMMH Prestwich Hospital in the last nine months. It’s a sad indictment of the decimation of the funding of our NHS that vulnerable young people cannot be protected.

“UNISON is aware of the staffing and retention issues at GMMH,. We know that front-line NHS workers are endeavouring to giving the level of support that young people need, whilst struggling against the tide of staff and finance reductions.

“More Mancunians than ever are struggling with their mental health, and UNISON call on those who fund the NHS to be aware of the real impact of funding cuts to mental health support, particularly for young people.

“The NHS is the most valuable resource we have. It needs to be funded properly to protect and support the people who need it the most.

“Our thoughts and solidarity go out to the families of the Ania, Charlie and Rowan.”

Commenting on the union’s concerns, Gill Green, Director of Nursing & Governance for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust said: “We can confirm there are no wards or units closed across the Trust due to staffing levels.

“Wards in our Child and Adolescent Mental Health Units continue to be safely staffed, with robust contingency plans in place to ensure continued care for young people on our units.”

The trust’s Nursing Director Ms Green, also said: “The inspection team found several positive aspects of care including how well staff managed risks and followed best practice, how they protected patients from abuse and knew how to report it, and ease of access to clinical information.

“We accept there are areas for improvement such as levels of qualified staff on wards, which many NHS trusts are struggling with, however we have strong contingency plans in place to ensure we remain safely staffed.

“We ensure that patient safety and learning is embedded across the Trust as well as at local level.

“An action plan to address these areas is in development and we will share our progress with the CQC. This inspection does not affect our overall rating, which remains ‘Good’.”

Full article here

Source: Manchester Evening News, 1st December 2021

Watchdog ‘very concerned’ about safety of patients at Greater Manchester Mental Health Trust where 3 young people died

CQC is “very concerned” about the safety of people using the services of Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Trust. 

The damning report says inspectors found there was not always enough nursing staff and that permanent staff did not feel safe if bank or agency workers were used as they didn’t have the relevant training.

It follows an unannounced inspection in September by the Care Quality Commission “due to on-going concerns about the safety of services”.

Three young patients died in nine months at Prestwich Hospital, one of the Trust’s units. 

As revealed by the Manchester Evening News in July, Rowan Thompson, 18, died, in October last year, followed by Charlie Millers, 17, in December, and Ania Sohail, 21, in June this year. 

A campaign group and the families of Charlie and Rowan are campaigning for a full investigation into those cases by NHS England. 

The CQC’s two-day inspection of eight wards across five of the the Trust’s seven sites found:

* The service did not always have enough nursing staff, who knew the patients or received basic and essential training to keep patients safe from avoidable harm. 

* The environment on Poplar ward (Park House) was not clean on the first day of inspection and space on the ward was limited for patients. 

* It was not clear that immediate concerns or learning from incidents was shared across the locations, although local learning and reviews were taking place.

*The wards did not all have up to date and recently reviewed ligature risk assessments. Staff on two wards could not locate the ligature risk assessments at the time of the inspection.

Acute wards for adults of working age and psychiatric intensive care units (PICU) which were inspected were at:

• Griffin ward, an eight bedded female acute ward at Junction 17, Prestwich 

• Oak ward, a 20 bedded female acute ward at Rivington Unit, Bolton 

• Priestner’s Unit, an eight bedded mixed PICU at Atherleigh Park, Wigan 

• Medlock ward, a 21 bedded female acute ward at Moorside Unit, Trafford 

• Brook ward, a 22 bedded male acute ward at Moorside Unit, Trafford 

• Poplar ward, a 20 bedded female acute ward at Park House, Manchester 

• Juniper ward, a 10 bedded male PICU at Park House, Manchester 

• Laurel ward, a 23 bedded male acute ward at Park House, Manchester.

As it was a focused inspection and only looked at the safety of the wards, the ratings overall for the service do not change and remains as good. But the service remains “requires improvement” for being safe.

Brian Cranna, the CQC’s head of hospital inspection (mental health and community health services) said: “When we inspected these eight wards run by Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, we were very concerned about the safety of people using the services.

“There wasn’t always enough nursing and support staff on duty, although where the trust identified significant staff shortages, they’d put contingency plans in place. 

“It was worrying that permanent staff didn’t always feel safe when bank and agency staff were used as they didn’t always have the relevant training to give support if an incident occurred.

“The physical environment across some of the wards wasn’t always suitable for people’s needs or safety. 

“Although staff could describe where ligature points were located, it wasn’t clear how the trust was assured more formally that all potential risks had been identified and considered.

“Poplar ward had limited space for patients to spend time away from others as the dedicated quiet lounge was being used as an extra bed for capacity. 

“The ward was also dirty and smelt unpleasant, although we were pleased to see the trust acknowledged this and some improvements had been made when we visited on the second day. 

“We were also informed the ward was due to be re-decorated later in September.

“We have told the trust what further improvements they need to make to keep patients safe in an environment which meets their needs. We will continue to monitor them and return to inspect on their progress.”

The inspection also found good practice within the Trust. 

The report says staff assessed and managed risks to patients and themselves well and followed best practice in anticipating, de-escalating and managing challenging behaviour.

Gill Green, Director of Nursing and Governance for Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, said: “We welcome the Care Quality Commission findings, following their unannounced, focused inspections of some of our adult wards and psychiatric intensive care units in September.

“The inspection team found several positive aspects of care including how well staff managed risks and followed best practice, how they protected patients from abuse and knew how to report it, and ease of access to clinical information. 

“We accept there are areas for improvement such as levels of qualified staff on wards, which many NHS trusts are struggling with, however we have strong contingency plans in place to ensure we remain safely staffed.

“We ensure that patient safety and learning is embedded across the Trust as well as at local level. We also continue to to improve patient environments wherever we can, with area already identified for redecoration and refurbishment ahead of the inspection taking place. 

“An action plan to address these areas is in development and we will share our progress with the CQC. This inspection does not affect our overall rating, which remains ‘Good’.

At a pre-inquest hearing at Rochdale Coroners’ Court on September 17, senior coroner Joanne Kearsley said Rowan Thompson’s cause of death was currently ‘unascertained’.

Rebecca Titus-Cobb, a lawyer representing Rowan’s family, told the inquest the family had a number of concerns regarding Rowan’s treatment while on the unit.

She said there were ‘systemic issues regarding observation of patients on the unit’, and that the campaign group Inquest had contacted the Care Quality Commission to express concerns following a number of deaths, including Rowan’s.

The charity INQUEST, who campaign with families whose loved ones have died in the custody or care of the state, wrote to the CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospital, Professor Ted Baker, in September to demand further action.

In the letter, Chief Executive, Deborah Coles, said: “In light of these deaths and the serious concerns we have about the safety of Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust I am asking you, on behalf of bereaved families, to use CQC’s statutory powers to urgently visit this Trust and independently assess its treatment of young patients.

“These deaths have all taken place in the last ten months. We are working with the families of Charlie Millers and Rowan Thompson, two of the individuals who have died. It is our understanding all three of these deaths took place on the Junction 17 ward or Gardener Unit which are part of the Trust’s CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service) units.

“The fact of these deaths in such a short period of time – less than one year – is cause for great concern and we believe warrants immediate action from CQC.

“We therefore urge CQC to use the multiple mechanisms at its disposal to visit Junction 17 and the Gardener Unit at Prestwich Hospital to assess the treatment and conditions for patients and report publicly on the circumstances surrounding these extremely concerning deaths.”

Charlie Millers, the second youngster to die, – a ‘kind, caring lad’ – was found unresponsive in his room in the Junction 17 wing of Prestwich Hospital on December 2. He was given CPR at the scene and taken to Salford Royal Hospital but died five days later.

A Serious Incident Review done by the trust said that Charlie was seen with ligatures around his neck three times in the hours before he was found unresponsive with a ligature around his neck.

The review says he was alone at the time when he was found unresponsive in his room.

His mother, Samantha Millers, told the M.E.N that she was told her son was being checked on once every five minutes at the time he was fatally injured. She believes he should not have been left alone at all at the time.

He had previously had one-to-one monitoring because of his history of self-harm and attempts on his own life, the review says.

An inquest on Charlie’s death is due to take place in February. 

An inquest on Rowan’s is scheduled for June next year. His father, Marc, said: “Within 24 hours of Rowan’s death the Trust knew there was observation by staff issue. Within seven days they had done their own internal report which identified such problems. 

“The CQC says that it is not clear that learning from incidents was being shared across sites. Three months after Rowan’s death Charlie died. I believe if such learning had been shared Charlie’s death could have been avoided.”

Full article here

Source: Manchester Evening News, 26th November 2021

Green light for £105m Park House mental health unit in North Manchester

ospital bosses have been given the green light for a new £105.9 million specialist mental health unit in Manchester.

The UK Government has given its final approval for the major new site at North Manchester General Hospital.

It will replace Park House, the hospital’s existing mental health inpatient unit which provides assessment and treatment for adults and older people with mental health needs – including depression, schizophrenia, psychosis and dementia.

Source: Manchester Evening News, 14th November 2021

NHS England proposes new mental health access standards 

The NHS is set to take another major step towards improving patient access to mental health services with the introduction of five new waiting time guarantees.

The proposals could ensure that patients requiring urgent care will be seen by community mental health crisis teams within 24 hours of referral, with the most urgent getting help within four hours. Mental health liaison services for those who end up in A&E departments would also be rolled out to remaining sites across the country.

The NHS is consulting on the new standards, which have been piloted by mental health providers in collaboration with acute NHS trusts, and are backed by clinical and patient representatives.

See full article here

Source: NHS England, July 2021

Journeys of Hope And Freedom: A lived experience perspective

A CHARM Zoom Public Meeting

Wednesday, 8th December 2021

18:30 – 20:30

Book your place via EventBrite here

Tracey Higgins & Elisabeth Svanholmer reflect on their own journeys and how they found roads to autonomy and fulfilment

Two lived experience perspectives on the challenges of hearing voices and other extreme states.

Our speakers will reflect on their own journeys and how they found roads to autonomy and fulfilment. They will consider their experience of ‘schizophrenia’, medication, hospitalisation and the ways they found to recover their lives.

Tracey Higgins, is the author of The Girl on the Bridge: A Memoir. (2021) ‘….an exquisite, sensitive, and painful rendition of a struggle against almost impossible odds’. Her experience shows us that ‘schizophrenia’ doesn’t have to be a life sentence. While some mental health professionals called her hopeless, she went to college, worked in Government, and owned and operated a popular restaurant. “

Elisabeth Svanholmer lives with experiences of hearing voices and identifies as highly sensitive. She is on an ongoing journey to figure out how to be human in a world that seems increasingly fragmented and dehumanising. She is based in West Yorkshire, UK and is a self-taught facilitator and organiser of training, supervision and other ways of people coming together to learn and connect. She is passionate about creating space for things that may be considered uncomfortable, strange, inconvenient, confusing and distressing.
She finds inspiration and solace in nature, movement and relationships. See more about Elisabeth here

Organiser of Journeys of Hope And Freedom: A lived experience perspective
CHARM Communities for Holistic Accessible Rights based Mental Health
We are a campaign calling for changes in the way psychiatric services are provided in Greater Manchester.
We’ve teamed up with people with lived experience, trade unions, family groups and citizens
We are calling for a root and branch review and an action plan to transform mental health services in our communities.